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Project on Predatory Student Lending

ITT Student Files New Lawsuit Against Navient for Private Student Debt Cancellation | Press Release

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Harvard Magazine

“Attacking the Concept of Debt” | Harvard Magazine

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Update | Borrowers Raise Concern over Borrower Defense Denials

18 States, Consumer Groups Sue DeVos Over Delay of Student Loan Protections | Politico

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia filed suit against Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Thursday over her delay of regulations meant to protect federal student loan borrowers defrauded by their schools.

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Attorneys General Sue DeVos Over Delay of Rule to Protect Students from Predatory Colleges | The Washington Post

A group of 19 state attorneys general is suing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for delaying an overhaul of rules to erase the federal student debt of borrowers defrauded by colleges.

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18 States Are Suing Betsy DeVos Over For-Profit College Rules | BuzzFeed

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia are suing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and the Education Department over DeVos’s decision to roll back rules designed to help students who have been defrauded by their colleges.

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New Marching Orders for Civil Rights Probes | Politico

The Trump administration sent the clearest signal yet that it will take a different approach on Title IX enforcement when it issued a memo this month telling civil rights investigators to investigate only specific allegations in complaints — rather than take the systemic approach favored by the Obama administration.

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Former For-Profit Students Intervene in Borrower-Defense Lawsuit | Inside Higher ED

Two former students of an Education Management Corporation-owned for-profit college have filed suit to intervene as defendants in a lawsuit challenging borrower-defense regulations. The Department of Education cited the lawsuit, which was brought by an association of California for-profit colleges, in announcing a delay of the borrower-defense rule this week.

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Betsy DeVos Is Halting Protections For For-Profit College Students | BuzzFeed

In federal filings, the Education Department said it would renegotiate the federal “gainful employment” rule, which stops government money from flowing to for-profit colleges whose students take on too much debt, but earn little after they graduate. Years in the making — it went into effect in 2015 after surviving two lengthy court battles with the for-profit college industry — the regulation is arguably the most significant piece of President Obama’s higher education legacy.

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Betsy DeVos Delays 2 Obama-Era Rules Designed to Protect Students from Predatory For-Profit Colleges | The Washington Post

The Trump administration is suspending two key rules from the Obama administration that were intended to protect students from predatory for-profit colleges, saying it will soon start the process to write its own regulations.

The move made Wednesday by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos was a victory for Republican lawmakers and for-profit colleges that had lobbied against the rules. Critics denounced it, accusing the administration of essentially selling out students to help for-profit colleges stay in business.

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18 States Sue Betsy DeVos Over Student Loan Protections | The New York Times

Democratic attorneys general from 18 states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit on Thursday against the Education Department and its secretary, Betsy DeVos, challenging the department’s move last month to freeze new rules for erasing the federal loan debt of student borrowers who were cheated by colleges that acted fraudulently.

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Fighting Back Against For-Profit Universities | Boston Globe

When Stephano Del Rose enrolled in the New England Institute of Art in Brookline, he had bold dreams of a future in Web design and filmmaking. Lured by promises of cutting-edge digital equipment, internships, and industry connections, Del Rose, now 25, quickly signed on. But his enrollment contract instead led to a world of broken promises, heavy debt, and limited legal options.

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