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The Trump Administration Has Agreed to Make Final Decisions Within 18 Months on Nearly 170,000 Loan Forgiveness Applications | Politico

Under the agreement, the Education Department would be required to make a final decision on each of the claims within 18 months from the time the judge signs off on the deal. Borrowers still waiting for a decision after that time will have 30 percent of their loans discharged for each month the department misses the deadline.

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DeVos Reaches Settlement Over Stalled Student Debt Relief Claims | Washington Post

The Trump administration has agreed to process nearly 170,000 debt cancellation claims within 18 months from borrowers who say they were defrauded by their colleges. The proposed settlement agreement, filed in U.S. District Court in California on Friday, stems from a class-action lawsuit brought against Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and her agency in June by a group of borrowers awaiting decisions on their applications, some for as long as five years.

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DeVos Settles Suit Over Debt Relief for Defrauded Students | Courthouse News Service

Students who claim they were defrauded by for-profit colleges will get decisions on their requests for debt relief within 18 months under the terms of a proposed settlement reached with the U.S. Department of Education Friday.

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DeVos Reaches Settlement in Lawsuit Over Loan Relief Program | Associated Press

The U.S. Education Department is promising to process student loan forgiveness claims for nearly 170,000 borrowers within 18 months as part of a proposed settlement announced Friday in a federal lawsuit.

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Senate Passes Rebuke of DeVos Over Student Loan Forgiveness | ABC News

The Senate on Wednesday gave final congressional approval to a measure that would overturn rules issued by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in 2019 that made it harder for students to get loans erased after being misled by for-profit colleges.

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Senate Rejects DeVos Rule Restricting Debt Relief for Bilked Students | New York Times

In a bipartisan rebuke, the Senate voted on Wednesday to overturn a major Trump administration rule that would sharply limit debt relief for students misled by schools that lured them in with false claims about their graduates’ career and earning prospects.

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Lawsuit Challenges Trump Administration Toughening of Student Loan Cancellation Rules | NY Daily News

Kacey Martinez was stunned when her Manhattan college abruptly shut its doors in 2017, leaving her with no degree and thousands of dollars in debt. “I didn’t know that things like that happened,” fumed the 24-year-old Bronx resident of the sudden demise of TCI College of Technology in Chelsea.

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Senate Might Rebuke DeVos on Borrower Defense | Inside Higher Ed

For all of President Trump’s controversial policies, it has been rare for the Republican Senate to formally condemn the administration. But lobbyists on both sides of the debate over U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s borrower-defense rule say it’s increasingly possible that the Republican Senate could join the Democratic House in rebuking the administration over the rule critics say makes it harder for defrauded students to have their education loans forgiven.

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Student Loan Borrowers Sue Betsy DeVos – Again | Forbes

Student loan borrowers have filed yet another lawsuit against Education Secretary Betsy DeVos over the Borrower Defense to Repayment program. Borrower Defense to Repayment was established in 2016 by the Obama administration. The program was created in the wake of the collapse of major for-profit colleges to provide student loan forgiveness for borrowers who were defrauded by their schools.

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DeVos, DOE Sued for Borrower Defense Ruling Again | Holland Sentinel

Another group has filed a lawsuit against U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos for the Department of Education’s reversal of an Obama-era borrower defense rule. The Project on Predatory Student Lending and Public Citizen Litigation Group (PPSL) is suing the DOE in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, the group announced in a press release on Wednesday, Feb. 19.

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