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Student Advocates Again Challenge DeVos in Court For Trashing Obama-Era Rules | Republic Report

Trump education secretary Betsy DeVos has trashed two key rules that the Department of Education, during the Obama administration, painstakingly developed to discourage for-profit colleges from deceiving and abusing their own students. With a new lawsuit filed today, advocates for students are now in court fighting to cancel both of the DeVos anti-rules and keep the previous Department regulations in place.

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Why People with Student Debt are Refusing to Repay It | CNBC

Sandy Nurse doesn’t see why she needs to be $120,000 in debt “just for trying to improve my understanding of the world.” And so, after a decade of struggling to repay her student loans, she plans to stop trying. She hopes others will join her, too, in a national strike against the country’s outstanding student loan debt, which is marching toward $1.7 trillion.

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Muddied Picture for Defrauded Borrowers | Inside Higher Ed

Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives were able to pass a measure last week expressing opposition to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s borrower-defense rule. But because of politics and both ongoing and upcoming legal battles, the vote did little to clear up what will happen to students who are asking for their loans to be discharged because they were defrauded by colleges.

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House votes to make it easier for scammed borrowers to cancel student loans | MarketWatch

Federal lawmakers voted Thursday to block Education Department rules that would make it harder for scammed students to wipe away loans from shuttered schools. The Democrat-controlled U.S. House of Representatives passed a measure that would halt rules slated for implementation in July and reinstate Obama administration-era regulations on how to deal with the debt loads of students with useless degrees.

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Canceling Student Debt Is Easier Than It Sounds | NPR

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., has pledged to cancel up to $50,000 of debt for 95% of student loan borrowers if she is elected president. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., has proposed an even more generous plan if he’s elected.

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White House contender Warren sees path to cancel student loan debt without Congress | Reuters

Democrat Elizabeth Warren outlined on Tuesday how, if elected to the White House, she would on the first day of her presidency cancel federal student loan debt by using the Department of Education’s pre-existing authority.

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Warren Would Bypass Congress to Cancel Federal Student Debt | Bloomberg

Senator Elizabeth Warren proposed Tuesday to ease federal student loan debt with executive authority, in a policy rollout aimed at attracting young voters. Warren said that as president, she would not wait for Congress to approve her plans to cancel or modify federal student debt. Instead, she would directly authorize the Department of Education to provide as much as $50,000 in relief to about 95% of student loan borrowers.

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Elizabeth Warren says she will use presidential authority to cancel student loan debt if elected | Boston Globe

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White House Contender Warren Sees Path to Cancel Student Loan Debt Without Congress | New York Times

Democrat Elizabeth Warren outlined on Tuesday how, if elected to the White House, she would on the first day of her presidency cancel federal student loan debt by using the Department of Education’s pre-existing authority. Warren had previously called for the cancellation of up to $50,000 in student loan debt for each of about 42 million borrowers, but had not outlined the specific steps she would take or the timing.

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Warren vows to cancel college debt without awaiting Congress | Associated Press

Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren says she’d order her secretary of education to cancel up to $50,000 in college debt for about 95% of student borrowers on her first day in office, effectively erasing outstanding loans for about 42 million Americans. The Democratic senator from Massachusetts vowed in a proposal released Tuesday to act immediately and not wait for Congress because the secretary of education already has broad authority to compromise on and modify student loans.

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