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DeVos Strikes Out — In Court | Politico

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ attempts to swiftly roll back major Obama-era policies at her agency are hitting a roadblock: federal courts. Judges have rebuffed DeVos’ attempts to change Obama policies dealing with everything from student loan forgiveness to mandatory arbitration agreements to racial disparities in special education programs.

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Argosy University Closing Leaves Students Scrambling | Consumer Affairs

Another for-profit college has shut its doors, leaving many of its students with no degree and lots of debt. Argosy University, which operated brick-and-mortar campuses in Virginia, California, Illinois, Florida, Arizona, and other states had to turn out the lights after the U.S. Department of Education expelled it from the federal financial aid program.

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Education Department to Enforce Obama-era Ban on Mandatory Arbitration | Politico Pro

The Education Department said on Friday that it will begin enforcing an Obama-era ban on colleges using mandatory arbitration agreements, after a federal judge last fall thwarted the Trump administration’s efforts to stop the policy.

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4 Ideas for Improving Education From The Chronicle’s 2019 ‘Shark Tank’ | The Chronicle of Higher Education

Let’s start with a disclaimer: Vetting the pitches for our Shark Tank: Edu Edition at SXSW EDU is an utterly unscientific process. The goal is to unearth some interesting ideas and have some fun exploring their pros and cons.

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A College Chain Crumbles, and Millions in Student Loan Cash Disappears | New York Times

When the Education Department approved a proposal by Dream Center, a Christian nonprofit with no experience in higher education, to buy a troubled chain of for-profit colleges, skeptics warned that the charity was unlikely to pull off the turnaround it promised.

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SEC Gives Former Execs of Corinthian Colleges, a Massive Scam, Slaps on the Wrist | LA Times

Corinthian Colleges was a higher-education scam that defrauded tens of thousands of low-income students out of as much as $100 million in federally backed loans. Many are still struggling with the consequences because the Trump administration is refusing to grant them full relief from their student debt.

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What Happens to Students When Private Colleges Close in Arizona? | Arizona Central

Marta Villanueva enrolled in a culinary program at the Art Institute of Phoenix as a way to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety after leaving the Army. She used GI Bill benefits to pay for classes, which began in mid-2017. She dreamed of opening a business one day.

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Harvard Law School Sues U.S. Department of Justice Over Document Access | Penn Record

A Harvard law project is suing the United States Department of Justice, citing alleged breach of duty. The Project on Predatory Student Lending of the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School filed a complaint on Dec. 7 in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania against the United States Department of Justice for alleged violation of the Freedom of Information Act.

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Defeated In Court, Education Dept. To Cancel $150 Million Of Student Loan Debt | NPR

The U.S. Department of Education is sending emails to about 15,000 people across the country telling them: You’ve got money. These are former students — and some parents of students — who took out loans for colleges that shut down between Nov. 1, 2013, and Dec. 4, 2018. About half attended campuses run by Corinthian Colleges. They will get their money back or have their debt forgiven — an amount estimated at $150 million, all told — under a provision called Automatic Closed School Discharge.

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Dept. of Education to Cancel $150 Million in Student Loan Debt | NBC News

The U.S. Department of Education announced Thursday it would automatically cancel $150 million in student loans connected to for-profit colleges that closed in recent years. The move was made under an Obama-era policy that a federal judge in October essentially forced U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to implement. The story was first reported by Politico.

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