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Education Dept. Left Social Security Numbers of Thousands of Borrowers Exposed for Months | Washington Post

The Education Department left the Social Security numbers of tens of thousands of people seeking student debt relief unprotected and susceptible to a data breach for at least six months, according to people familiar with the matter. Angela Morabito, a spokeswoman for the Education Department, acknowledged the error but called it “nonevent.” The data was “was on the department’s secure, internal server, and there is no indication anyone outside the department could have had access to it,” she said. “There is also no indication anyone inside the department handled this file improperly.”

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Whistleblower: Education Department Killed Website That Made Applying for Loan Forgiveness Too Easy | U.S. News and World Report

The Trump administration rejected a website that the Education Department’s Federal Student Aid office designed to help students who have been defrauded by their colleges apply for loan forgiveness, arguing the tool made the process too easy, according to a whistleblower complaint.

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For-Profit Colleges Stole Our Past 10 Years. But Trump Has the Chance to Make it Right. | USA Today

When we met in 2007, we were on our way to achieving the American dream, and we were doing it together. We were students at the now-closed Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale in Florida. Thirteen years and some 25 student loans later, our dreams of marriage, a family and home ownership have been deferred by our overwhelming student loan debt.

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Why Did The CARES Act Give More Money To Hair Schools Than To A Community College? | NBC News

After $14 billion was set aside for higher education in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, Houston Community College and the Paul Mitchell Schools both got financial relief. The Houston college, a public institution with nearly 60,000 students, received $28.3 million. The for-profit hair and cosmetology schools received $30.5 million, despite serving only 20,000 students.

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Students Call College That Got Millions In Coronavirus Relief ‘A Sham’ | NPR

A for-profit college received millions of dollars from the federal government to help low-income students whose lives have been upended by the coronavirus outbreak, but that same school, Florida Career College (FCC), is also accused of defrauding students.

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For-Profit College Set To Collect $17 Million In Federal Stimulus Cash Is Sued For Predatory Practices | Forbes

Florida Career College, a for-profit two-year vocational school, is getting $17 million in federal coronavirus relief money. It’s one of dozens of for-profits slated to receive a total of $1.1 billion in grants included in the $14 billion Congress set aside for institutions of higher education in the CARES Act, passed last month.

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Class Action: Ex-Students Sue Florida For-Profit College Over Allegedly Worthless Education | LAW.COM

Former students have bad things to say about a for-profit college that allegedly took their money and left them jobless.

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Florida For-Profit College, Getting $17 Million in COVID-19 Aid, Accused of Scamming Black Students | Republic Report

Faced with concerns from critics in Congress and elsewhere that many for-profit colleges will take advantage of the COVID-19 crisis to accelerate predatory behavior, the industry’s chief lobbyist, Steve Gunderson, has been repeating his claim that the bad actors among for-profit schools have shuttered, and what remains are sincere, hard-working operations focused on helping students.

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DeVos Backs Down, Agrees To Process Student Loan Forgiveness Applications | Forbes

In a victory for student loan borrowers, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has agreed to process long-stalled applications for student loan forgiveness. Student loan borrowers had submitted nearly 170,000 applications for student loan forgiveness pursuant to the Borrower Defense to Repayment program.

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Education Department to Resolve Borrower-Defense Case | Inside Higher Ed

The Education Department agreed to process 170,000 claims by student loan borrowers who want their debts canceled because they were misled by their colleges under a settlement jointly proposed by the department and a consumer group.

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