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Why Did The CARES Act Give More Money To Hair Schools Than To A Community College?

After $14 billion was set aside for higher education in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, Houston Community College and the Paul Mitchell Schools both got financial relief. The Houston college, a public institution with nearly 60,000 students, received $28.3 million. The for-profit hair and cosmetology schools received $30.5 million, despite serving only 20,000 students.

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Students Call College That Got Millions In Coronavirus Relief ‘A Sham’ | NPR

A for-profit college received millions of dollars from the federal government to help low-income students whose lives have been upended by the coronavirus outbreak, but that same school, Florida Career College (FCC), is also accused of defrauding students.

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Live Updates: Latest News on Coronavirus and Higher Education | Inside Higher Ed

Top Democratic lawmakers said they will propose forgiving the loans of Corinthian and ITT Tech student loan borrowers, who have claimed they were misled by their institutions, as part of the next coronavirus relief package.

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DeVos Backs Down, Agrees To Process Student Loan Forgiveness Applications | Forbes

In a victory for student loan borrowers, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has agreed to process long-stalled applications for student loan forgiveness. Student loan borrowers had submitted nearly 170,000 applications for student loan forgiveness pursuant to the Borrower Defense to Repayment program.

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Education Department to Resolve Borrower-Defense Case | Inside Higher Ed

The Education Department agreed to process 170,000 claims by student loan borrowers who want their debts canceled because they were misled by their colleges under a settlement jointly proposed by the department and a consumer group.

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The Trump Administration Has Agreed to Make Final Decisions Within 18 Months on Nearly 170,000 Loan Forgiveness Applications | Politico

Under the agreement, the Education Department would be required to make a final decision on each of the claims within 18 months from the time the judge signs off on the deal. Borrowers still waiting for a decision after that time will have 30 percent of their loans discharged for each month the department misses the deadline.

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DeVos Reaches Settlement Over Stalled Student Debt Relief Claims | Washington Post

The Trump administration has agreed to process nearly 170,000 debt cancellation claims within 18 months from borrowers who say they were defrauded by their colleges. The proposed settlement agreement, filed in U.S. District Court in California on Friday, stems from a class-action lawsuit brought against Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and her agency in June by a group of borrowers awaiting decisions on their applications, some for as long as five years.

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DeVos Settles Suit Over Debt Relief for Defrauded Students | Courthouse News Service

Students who claim they were defrauded by for-profit colleges will get decisions on their requests for debt relief within 18 months under the terms of a proposed settlement reached with the U.S. Department of Education Friday.

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DeVos Reaches Settlement in Lawsuit Over Loan Relief Program | Associated Press

The U.S. Education Department is promising to process student loan forgiveness claims for nearly 170,000 borrowers within 18 months as part of a proposed settlement announced Friday in a federal lawsuit.

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Fine Print of Stimulus Bill Contains Special Deals for Industries | New York Times

Restaurants and retailers will get a tweak to federal tax law they have been seeking for more than a year that could save them $15 billion. Community banks are being granted their long-held wish of being freed to reduce the amount of capital they have to hold in reserve. And for-profit colleges will be able to keep federal loan money from students who drop out because of the coronavirus.

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