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Why Did The CARES Act Give More Money To Hair Schools Than To A Community College? | NBC News

After $14 billion was set aside for higher education in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, Houston Community College and the Paul Mitchell Schools both got financial relief. The Houston college, a public institution with nearly 60,000 students, received $28.3 million. The for-profit hair and cosmetology schools received $30.5 million, despite serving only 20,000 students.

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Students Call College That Got Millions In Coronavirus Relief ‘A Sham’ | NPR

A for-profit college received millions of dollars from the federal government to help low-income students whose lives have been upended by the coronavirus outbreak, but that same school, Florida Career College (FCC), is also accused of defrauding students.

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For-Profit College Set To Collect $17 Million In Federal Stimulus Cash Is Sued For Predatory Practices | Forbes

Florida Career College, a for-profit two-year vocational school, is getting $17 million in federal coronavirus relief money. It’s one of dozens of for-profits slated to receive a total of $1.1 billion in grants included in the $14 billion Congress set aside for institutions of higher education in the CARES Act, passed last month.

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Class Action: Ex-Students Sue Florida For-Profit College Over Allegedly Worthless Education | LAW.COM

Former students have bad things to say about a for-profit college that allegedly took their money and left them jobless.

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Florida For-Profit College, Getting $17 Million in COVID-19 Aid, Accused of Scamming Black Students | Republic Report

Faced with concerns from critics in Congress and elsewhere that many for-profit colleges will take advantage of the COVID-19 crisis to accelerate predatory behavior, the industry’s chief lobbyist, Steve Gunderson, has been repeating his claim that the bad actors among for-profit schools have shuttered, and what remains are sincere, hard-working operations focused on helping students.

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What Do Students Do When a For-Profit College Closes? | The Atlantic

Jasmine Lee had finally found something she was happy with and wanted to pursue. She had been working as a medical assistant at an orthopedic center, and she was enjoying it. But she wanted more. So she figured she should check out the certificate program at Virginia College in Birmingham, where she works.

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Major For-Profit School Chain Closes, Leaving Tens of Thousands of Students Scrambling | The Hill

Thousands of students are reportedly left scrambling after Education Corp. of America (ECA), one of the country’s largest for-profit college chains, announced Wednesday that it would be abruptly closing more than 70 campuses across the United States.

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Students Stunned After Major For-Profit College Chain Closes: ‘They’re Taking Our Dreams Away’ | NBC News

Jasmin Cantú, a student at Brightwood College in Texas, said she was in the middle of taking a medical assistant certification exam Wednesday when a school official came into the classroom in tears, delivering a message Cantú never thought she would hear. The school was shutting down and the last day of classes would be Friday, she said.

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Trump Administration Stymies Release of Salary, Loan Debt Data From Certain Colleges, Advocates Say | CNBC

At a recent conference on financial aid, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said that every school should help its students graduate with high-quality career prospects and little debt. Students should be equipped, she added, with information that allows them to be responsible consumers.

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Major For-Profit College Chain Collapses, Leaving Students Scrambling | MarketWatch

A major for-profit college chain shut down Wednesday, leaving roughly 20,000 students scrambling to figure out their next steps. Education Corporation of America, the parent company of schools like Virginia College and Brightwood Career Institute, closed its doors after several months of financial turmoil due in large part to declining enrollment.

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