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FAQ: What We Know About ED’s Recent ITT Announcement

Recently, the Department of Education announced that it will approve a small portion of borrower defense applications for former ITT students, with 18,000 borrowers to receive a 100% discharge of their ITT debt. While this is great news for those select borrowers, there are still a lot of questions around what this means for the more than 700,000 former ITT students who were scammed by the school.

Student Loan Truth: For-Profit Colleges Aren’t Just Out to Scam Students. They’re Scamming Their Parents, Too. | Blog

It’s no surprise that being ripped off by a for-profit college impacts more than just the student who attends. A student borrower’s unpayable debts affect their whole family. And there’s a way that parents can bear the debt burden personally: Parent PLUS loans.

The Project on Predatory Student Lending: 5 Years of Impact | Blog

Project co-founders Toby Merrill and Eileen Connor take a look back at five years of impact helping defrauded student borrowers against for-profit colleges.

Student Loan Truth: Eynelys’ DeVry University Story | Blog

DeVry misled Eynelys about their financial aid plan and job placement services, leading her to drop out of her program. In 2016, the Federal Trade Commission sued DeVry for making deceptive claims related to graduate job placement rates and compensation. Eynelys filed a borrower defense application four years ago, seeking relief from her student loan debt, and still has not received a decision from the Department of Education.

Student Loan Truth: Ollie’s New England Institute of Art Story | Blog

The New England Institute of Art promised Ollie Venezia flexible class schedules, 1-on-1 support, quality internship placements, and post-graduation career help. What they got was something else entirely. What they got was almost $200,000 of student loan debt – and an invoice instead of a diploma on graduation day. This is Ollie’s story.

What the Latest Student Debt Announcement from The Department of Education Means for Defrauded Borrowers | Blog

On March 18, 2021, the Department announced full debt cancellation for borrowers with partial relief decisions on their borrower defense applications. More than 90% of borrower defense applicants are not affected by the Education Department’s partial relief announcement because their applications were denied or because they are still waiting for a decision. Here’s what that means.

Project on Predatory Student Lending Statement on Order in NYLAG v. DeVos | Blog

On Wednesday (March 17th) a judge ruled on the challenge to the DeVos borrower defense rule in the case NYLAG v. DeVos. We argued that many different parts of the rule are unlawful and illogical. The judge agreed that the three-year statute of limitations on defensive claims was illegal, and sent that part back to…

How COVID-19 Has Impacted Thousands of Defrauded Student Borrowers | Blog

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented economic vulnerability for millions of people across the country. For student borrowers who have been defrauded by for-profit colleges, this struggle has only been exacerbated.

Dear Secretary Cardona: Cancel For-Profit College Debt Now | Blog

The government has a legal obligation to cancel the debts of our clients, students defrauded by predatory for-profit colleges, and they cannot afford to wait any longer. That’s why we wrote a letter to President Biden’s recently confirmed Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, outlining his authority and obligation to take three immediate actions to finally provide justice for students who were harmed by this industry.

Student Loan Truth: Blake’s Art Institute Story | Blog

After personal loss made him take another look at his life, Blake Baron decided to invest in his future and pursue a degree in graphic design at the Art Institute. But he quickly realized that the time he invested in the program and the money he was spending wasn’t worth the terrible education he was getting. Even after leaving the school without a degree, he still owes over $30,000 in federal loans.